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UK EU guitar sale

UK/Europe Clearance Sale

THREE DAYS ONLY. Up to 45% OFF with FREE SHIPPING. No extra taxes, No duties. All items are brand new. Limited Quantities! All prices are in USA Dollars. 

Fire Bird Sunburst – Reg: $959 SALE $659 SAVE $300

dhwhite




 
Airline Newport Left-Hand – Reg: $1329 SALE $899 SAVE $430

dhwhite




Custom Kraft DLX Sunburst – Reg: $719 SALE $539 SAVE $180

dhwhite




 
Custom Kraft DLX Greenburst – Reg: $719 SALE $499 SAVE $220

dhwhite




 
Airline Twin Tone Green – Reg: $599 SALE $479 SAVE $120

dhwhite




 

Sidejack Baritone 1P – Reg: $599 SALE $450 SAVE $150

dhwhite




 
Airline Link Wray Tribute – Reg: $959 SALE $679 SAVE $280

dhwhite




 
Airline Jupiter Redburst – Reg: $599 SALE $479 SAVE $130

dhwhite




 

Airline Folkstar Blue – Reg: $959 SALE $699 SAVE $260

dhwhite




 

Eastwood S-200 Black – Reg: $839 SALE $479 SAVE $360

norma3ts




Microfret Martian Green – Reg: $1999 SALE $890 SAVE $1100

micro-frets-f




 

Eastwood Swinger – Reg: $599 SALE $359 SAVE $240

swingmasterSTD




 

Liberty MS-150 – Reg: $719 SALE $569 SAVE $150

k2lred



SOLD

 

 

Eastwood Wedgtail – Reg: $1079 SALE $699 SAVE $1000

deerhoodblack




 

Be Stiff Bass – Reg:$599 SALE $479 SAVE $120

h59cad




 

Kingston Flying Wedge – Reg: $779 SALE $479 SAVE $300

c4orange




 

DEVO Whip It – Reg: $599 SALE $479 SAVE $120

c6blue




 

Mandocaster Black – Reg: $479 SALE $390 SAVE $90

mandoblk




 

RD Artist Sunburst – Reg: $839 SALE $629 SAVE $210

rd3ts




Sidejack EoC Metallic Red – Reg: $879 SALE $579 SAVE $300

rd3ts




Mike Robinson
USA guitar sale

USA Clearance Sale

THREE DAYS ONLY. Up to 45% OFF with FREE SHIPPING. All items are brand new. Limited Quantities! 

Airline H77 Black – Reg: $699 SALE $579

dhwhite




Eastwood LG-50 – Reg: $599 SALE $425

dhwhite




Airline Twin Tone Green – Reg: $499 SALE $399

dhwhite




Eastwood Fire Bird – Reg: $799 SALE $579

dhwhite




 

Sidejack Baritone 1P – Reg: $499 SALE $375

dhwhite




 

Eastwood S-200 Black – Reg: $699 SALE $399

norma3ts




Eastwood S-200 Sunburst – Reg: $699 SALE $399

norma3ts



SOLD OUT

Microfret Martian Green – Reg: $999 SALE $749

micro-frets-f




 

Eastwood Swinger – Reg: $499 SALE $299

swingmasterSTD




 

Liberty MS-150 – Reg: $599 SALE $479

k2lred




 

Eastwood Wedgtail – Reg: $899 SALE $599

deerhoodblack




 

Be Stiff Bass – Reg:$499 SALE $399

h59cad




  Kingston Flying Wedge – Reg: $649 SALE $399

c4orange




 

DEVO Whip It – Reg: $499 SALE $399

c6blue




 

Mandocaster White – Reg: $399 SALE $329

mandoblk




 

RD Artist Sunburst – Reg: $699 SALE $529

rd3ts





Mike Robinson
Canada sale

CANADA SALE – No Taxes – No Duties – Dollar at PAR

Canadians can save over 35% with NO TAXES, NO DUTIES and Canadian Dollars at PAR! All items are brand new stock.

We only have one of each of these in stock, so pull the trigger NOW:

*** ALL PRICES IN CANADIAN DOLLARS  *** 

Liberty MS-150 –$529 CAD was $799 CAD + tax Save over $300*

k2lred



SOLD

 

 

Sidejack HB DLX Black – $549 CAD was $729 CAD + tax Save over $225*

sjhbblack



Deerhoof DLX (includes trem) – $799 CAD  was $929 CAD + tax Save over $175*

dhwhite




Norma EG 512-4 Sunburst – $699 CAD was $929 CAD + tax Save over $280*

norma3ts




Microfret DLX Martian Green – $979 CAD was $1599 CAD + tax Save over $700*

micro-frets-f




Airline Swingmaster STD – $979 CAD was $1299 CAD + tax Save over $380*

swingmasterSTD



 

Ichiban K2-L Metallic Red – $599 CAD was $799 CAD + tax Save over $250*

k2lred




Deerhoof DLX(includes trem) – $699 CAD was $1129 CAD + tax Save over $500*

deerhoodblack




Airline H59 – $699 CAD was $749 CAD + tax Save over $85*

h59cad




Astrojet Tenor DLX – $799 CAD was $1069 CAD + tax

astrotendlx



SOLD

 

Classic 4 Orange – $499 CAD was $729 CAD + tax Save over $280*

c4orange


SOLD

 

 

 

Classic 6 Blueburst Red – $579 CAD was $769 CAD + tax Save over $240*

c6blue




 

Classic 6 DLX Walnut- $649 CAD was $869 CAD + tax Save over $270*

c6dlxwal




Classic 6 HB Cherry – $549 CAD was $729 CAD + tax Save over $200

c6hbcherry2



SOLD

 

Mandocaster Black – $399 CAD was $499 CAD + tax Save over $130*

mandoblk



SOLD

 

RD Artist Sunburst – $699 CAD was $929 CAD + tax Save over $260*

rd3ts




Sidejack HB DLX Cherry – $549 CAD was $729 CAD + tax Save over $200*

sjhbcherry



SOLD

 

Warren Ellis Mandostang – $399 CAD was $529 CAD + tax Save over $160*

mandostang



SOLD

 

Sidejack Baritone 1P – $499 CAD was $669 CAD + tax Save over $200*

bari1pblack




* Savings include between 9%-17% taxes and duties.
Mike Robinson
baritones2sml

BARITONE GUITAR: What It Is & Why You Need One

One of the best selling models from Eastwood Guitars is the Sidejack Baritone. More recently they have also introduced the Airline MAP Baritone. Why are they so popular? First, let’s take a look at what a Baritone guitar is.

Baritone guitar

Simply put, they are exactly the same as any standard electric guitar but with a lower voice. A standard guitars tuning (from lowest string to highest) is E A D G B E. Baritone guitars are usually tuned a fifth lower (A D G C E A), or a fourth lower (B E A D F♯ B). Therefore, all the chord patterns you already know are exactly the same on a baritone, but simply produce a lower voice.

Why use a baritone when I can tune my standard guitar lower?

“So why not just take my trusty Fender and tune it lower?” you might ask. If you did, you’ll find the strings to be too “floppy” and not enough tension to produce a useable sound. The solution? Make the neck longer and use heavier strings. More precisely, make the “scale length” longer and use heavier strings. What is the scale length?

Airline Baritone Guitar & Eastwood Baritone GuitarAirline Baritone Guitar & Eastwood Baritone Guitar

The scale length is the precise length of the suspended string, the length between the nut and the bridge. Generally speaking, most Gibson style guitars have a 24 ¾” scale and most Fender style guitars have a 25 1/2” scale. String sets of 10-46 gauge are typical for these guitars tuned E-E. On the other end, tuned a full octave below the standard guitar at E-E, a Fender Bass has a scale length of 34” and strings in the 45-100 range. Eastwood produces a number of “short scale” bass models, with a 30 ½” and 32” scale, also with the 45-100 string sets.

Most Baritone guitars fit in the middle and have a scale length ranging from 27” to 28”. Eastwood’s Sidejack Baritone has a 27” scale and uses D’addario Baritone Light strings, 13-62, tuned B-B.

 

Tension Chart

        Diameter     Tension  
Item # Note Inches mm lbs kg  
PL013 B 0.0130 0.3300 20.940 9.500  
PL017 F# 0.0170 0.4300 20.100 9.120  
NW026 D 0.0260 0.6604 25.020 11.350  
NW036 A 0.0360 0.9144 25.920 11.760  
NW046 E 0.0460 1.1684 23.020 10.440  
NW062 B 0.0620 1.5748 23.780 10.780  

Why is a baritone guitar useful and why should I buy one?

OK, with all that technical stuff out of the way, the next question, “why is a baritone useful and why should I buy one?” The real advantage is that ANY guitar player can pick one up and be an expert baritone player immediately as the tuning is identical to their standard guitar, just lower. So every chord pattern you play is identical on the baritone. For example, when you play an open E chord on your guitar, you’ll do exactly the same on your Eastwood baritone, but it will be an open B. Get it? So you can play any song or riff you already know, right out of the box, but you’ll notice a darker, more haunting texture in your tone.

Coming Soon: Classic 6 Baritone semi-acoustic

New Eastwood Custom Shop Classic 6 Baritone

New Eastwood Custom Shop Classic 6 Baritone

Truth be told, baritone guitars are still a little bit of a niche, though not as much as it used to be, and we’ve notice a steady increase in the number of users over the years. But still, you won’t find many semi-acoustic models available out there, which makes this recent Eastwood Custom Shop very appealing: Imagine a George Harrison Country Gent-style guitar… but with longer scale for a slightly darker tone! Sounds amazing… at the moment, the Eastwood Customs Classic 6 Baritone is a crowdfunding project, and those interested need only leave a small deposit to guarantee theirs and make sure the guitar gets made. 

Classic 6 baritone

A brief history of… Baritone guitars

Next, let’s take a look at the history behind the baritone. Danelectro was the first to introduce the electric baritone guitar in the late 1950s where it soon appeared in a lot of 60’s surf music as well as background music for many movie soundtracks, especially spaghetti westerns. These days you’ll hear baritone in all types of music from folk to rock to heavy metal. The voice of the baritone is low enough to stand out in the mix next to a standard guitar and is high enough to cut through well above the bass.

The Evens

Ian McKeye and his baritone guitar, live with The Evens

Brian Wilson used baritones often in his arrangements with the Beach Boys. Glen Campbell used them in great songs like Wichita Lineman.  Ian Mackaye from Minor Threat uses a Sidejack baritone with his band The Evens. Jazz guitarist Pat Metheny uses baritones in his arsenal of guitars. Pat Smear of the Foo Fighters also uses a Sidejack Baritone. Colin Newman of Wire (who came up with the idea) uses the Airline MAP Baritone. The great Richard Hawley (can you tell I’m a big fan?) uses a Sidejack Baritone on his recordings, many of which were inspired by one of the earliest adopters of the baritone, the fabulous Duane Eddy.

If you have a studio, you really NEED a baritone electric. You won’t have to invest any time in learning to play it and you will quickly discover many useful applications. Eastwood produces a few variations and price points to suit every need. The Sidejack Standard and Deluxe baritones are under $500, great bang for the buck. The new Airline MAP and MAP DLX are killer baritones and come in under $900.

shop for baritone guitars

OK… How does a baritone guitar sound?

Here is a great example, where RJ Ronquillo rearranges Wrecking Ball by Miley Cyrus using the new Airline MAP DLX Baritone. The result is a deep, dark, beautifully haunting and more tearful composition than the original – “stripped” down to just a Baritone, without the need for gratuitous nudity.

 

Check out RJ here again, riffing along with his Sidejack Baritone giving “Hey Joe” a darker bluesy vibe, then showing the versatility of a baritone in surf and western styles.

Here is Lance Keltner taking a Sidejack Baritone for a spin with his band. Note the clarity when played along with a Stormbird Bass.

The baritone is also very useful when paired with a wide variety of effects:

..and with a little dirt too to give you that garage rock sound.

..and you can have hours of fun driving the baritone through GuitarRig 4:

So there you have it. Starting at just $429, it’s time to jump on the baritone bandwagon! Take home one of Eastwood’s family of baritone guitars and add some punch to your playing and recording endeavors. You’ll be glad you did.

update Oct 5/2014: here is a link to a recent Premier Guitar review of the Airline MAP Baritone:

http://www.premierguitar.com/articles/20377-eastwood-guitars-airline-map-baritone-review

Also just announced the MAP Baritone received the 2014 “Premier Gear Award”

Mike Robinson
Eastwood Airline Map Guitar (Sunburst)

Airline MAP in Sunburst Finish Shipping NOW

MAP-sunburst_5503

Feast your eyes on this new Airline MAP in Sunburst. Available TODAY, only 16 in this production run, so don’t wait too long to pull the trigger.

only $879 (optional hardshell case $99. VAT extra for UK and EU).




Body: Tone Chambered Mahogany
Neck: Maple, Bolt-on
Fingerboard: Rosewood, Block Markers
Scale Length: 24 3/4″ (628mm) 22 frets, Zero Fret
Width at Nut: 1 11/16″
Pickups: Dual Humbuckers
Switching: 3-way Vintage Tone Control
Controls: 1 Volume, 2 Tone
Bridge: Tun-o-matic Roller Bridge, Bigsby B-50
Hardware: Grover Style Nickel/Chrome
Strings: 10-46
Case: extra
Unique Features: Tone Chambered Mahogany Body
Suggested Retail: $1099.00 US

More pictures:

MAP-sunburst_5501 MAP-sunburst_5502 MAP-sunburst_55010 MAP-sunburst_5509 MAP-sunburst_5508 MAP-sunburst_5507 MAP-sunburst_5506 MAP-sunburst_5505 MAP-sunburst_5504

 

Mike Robinson
Eastwood Airline '59 Newport Guitar (Black)

NEW Airline ’59 Newport features PIEZO Bridge Pickup

newportBLK550-1

Intruducing the new Airline NEWPORT. It is Eastwood’s take on the rare National Newport Val-Pro 88 from the late 50’s and early 60’s. It features two NY Mini Humbuckers and a Piezo pickup in the bridge with a 5-way swtich. Tones of tonal variations! Available in Black or Seafoam Green.

Only $1099, hardshell case included. Shipping TODAY, so don’t wait too long to pull the trigger.


choose Color:


SPECIFICATIONS:

Available in Black or Seafoam Green, Bigsby Optional

Body: Tone Chambered Mahogany
Neck: Maple, Bolt-on
Fingerboard: Maple, Sharks Tooth Fret Markers
Scale Length: 24 3/4″ Scale, Zero Fret
Width at Nut: 1 5/8″
Pickups: Dual NY Mini Humbuckers, Piezo Bridge
Switching: 5-way
Controls: 1 Volume, 1 Tone for each pickup, master volume
Bridge: Tun-o-matic
Hardware: Grover Style Nickel/Chrome
Strings: D’Addario #10
Case: INCLUDED
Unique Features: Rubber body binding, Piezo bridge pickup

More pictures:

newportSFG550-1 newportBLK550-4 newportBLK550-6 newportBLK550-3 newportBLK550-2 newportSFG550-6 newportSFG550-4 newportSFG550-2 newportBLK550-9 newportBLK550-1 newportSFG550-3 newportBLK550-8 newportBLK550-7 newportBLK550-5 newportSFG550-5

Mike Robinson
Magnatone Amps

Magnatone Amps – The Evolution of Boutique Tone, Yesterday & Today (Part 2)

Last month, we left off with a team in place to design, prototype, test, and market the new line of Magnatone amplifiers. This month we look at each series and model of the new Magnatone line and the features of each, including the world famous pitch-shifting vibrato circuit.

Let me start off by saying that the new Magnatone line of amps is no less than stellar! There are three series: the Studio Collection, Traditional Collection and the Master Collection. All exude tonal quality and craftsmanship, and that is before we consider the features of stereo pitch-shifting vibrato or tube-driven reverb. Between the three series or “collections,” Magnatone manages to offer something to meet just about every player’s needs. From five-watt studio amps to 6V6, American-voiced combos to EL34 British-inspired heads and cabs, Kornblum, Khan and the rest of the crew at Magnatone have produced a line of models that covers all of the bases.

Magnatone Amps

Magnatone Amps

Each collection includes three models. In the Studio Collection, Magnatone offers up three lower-wattage, class A tube amplifiers housed in solid pine, finger jointed cabinets covered in either black or burgundy faux crocodile covering.

The Lyric is a no-frills, 10 watt, Class A combo featuring one 12AX7, one 6L6 power tube and a 10-inch speaker. It’s perfect for studio, rehearsal and small club performances.

The Varsity is the big brother to the Lyric. A 15 watt, push-pull class A amplifier featuring two 12AX7 preamp tubes, two EL84 power tubes and a GZ34 rectifier, the Varsity is the perfect size for stage and studio. The combo houses a 75 watt, 12″ custom Magnatone speaker in a box that’s a bit larger than you might expect. The result is an amp with enough power and bottom end to blow the doors off of most joints. One of the coolest features of the Varsity is the Negative Feedback Switch, which acts as a 8db boost/cut, allowing the amp to take on two unique sonic personalities.

The third model in the Studio Collection is the new Panoramic. Debuted at the 2014 NAMM trade show, the Panoramic is a stereo, 5 watts per side, single-ended class A amplifier with two 12 AX7s, a 12AU7 and a duet of 6V6 power tubes. The Panoramic offers the famous Magnatone pitch-shifting, varistor stereo vibrato. Cabinet options include a 1×12″ or stereo 2-10″ speaker cab.

The Traditional Collection showcases the Twilighter, Twilighter Stereo and Single V models. Encased in a classy, brown tolex with retro style, the Traditional series amplifiers would look equally great on stage, in the studio or as a fine piece of furniture in your living room! All three models are American-voiced, push-pull class AB amplifiers featuring either 6V6 or 6L6 power tubes. All Traditional series amps also feature a tube driven, long pan reverb and true pitch-shifting, varistor vibrato which can be switched to conventional tremolo via the FM-AM switch. Each member of the Traditional Collection is an outstanding, boutique, American-voiced tube amp with a warmth and bloom usually only heard in the finest vintage tube amps of the 1960’s.

The Vibrato effect departs from the original vintage design by producing a much more lush and three dimensional quality that can be slowed much slower than it’s ancestors. The result is unsurpassed, dynamic fidelity with a modulation that is mesmerizing.

The Master Collection offers three models inspired by the British amp companies of the ’60s. The Super Fifteen and Super Thirty are 15 watt and stereo 15 watts per side, respectively. They are EL 84, push-pull class A amplifiers designed with sparkly, British styled clean tones as well as full throttle A class overdrive capabilities. Pair that with the option of Magantone’s true pitch-shifting vibrato and you have an amp that will please any die-hard, class A, British-tone purist!

The Super Fifty-Nine head is a unique model, even though it is listed as part of the Master Collection and aesthetically has the same black tolex and white satin grill cloth as its A class siblings. The Super Fifty-Nine is a British behemoth that features a two EL34, 45 watt, push-pull class AB power section. With two channels, the Super Fifty-Nine has the ability to straddle vintage British tones as well as more modern, gainy rock tones of the ’70s and ’80s. With an input layout similar to a vintage Bassman and the pitch-shifting vibrato circuit available in the classic channel only, one can bridge the two channels to produce a warbley, uni-vibe effect that conjures the soul of Hendrix and Trower. After hearing the Super Fifty-Nine, it comes as no surprise that the model was developed in conjunction with Billy Gibbons and has been the Reverend’s go to rig for the last year or so.

Each model is unique yet consistently voiced in the new Magnatone tradition. Most models come with either Magnatone branded, WGS designed speakers, or Celestion Gold Alnicos (Lyric is supplied with a Jensen P10R). Some models include a two button footswitch, and a 20k expression pedal is also optional for hands-free control of the vibrato speed.

Although Magnatone is currently offering amplifiers only, plans are underway to offer high end Magnatone guitars with the help of Boise-based luthiers John and Jake Bolin of Bolin Guitars.

So while we currently live in the golden age of boutique gear, it may seem an impossible feat to offer up something unique both in aesthetic style and high fidelity that balances the much sought retro tones and looks of the great classics with the needs of modern players. Yet Ted Kornblum, Obeid Khan, and the team at Magnatone have managed to do just that! With great tone, vibe and style, the Magnatone line of amplifiers is a home run, and the redesigned, true pitch-shifting, varistor vibrato is just the icing on the cake.

Magnatoneusa.com

Written by: David Anderson

Mike Robinson
Jack White's Fender Telecaster with Bigsby

A Brief History Of Jack White’s Guitar Collection

In an era where guitar heroes are a dying breed, Jack White stands among the greatest guitarists of his generation. His preference for older, more primitive equipment came at a time when most guitarists were neck-deep in processors, pedals and preamps. Relying on his distinct style and killer tone, White became the touchstone for a new movement of more blues-inspired guitarists.

White used a truly unique collection of instruments to propel his no-frills style into the limelight. As you will see, his equipment choices evolved slightly through the years depending on which of his many projects he was working on. Here is a breakdown of the guitars he has used through the many phases of his career.

The White Stripes:

1964 JB Hutto Montgomery Ward Airline
This is the most iconic guitar in Jack White’s arsenal of rare axes. This model was made for Montgomery Ward department stores in the early 60s.  This guitar was White’s workhorse throughout his time with the White Stripes.

Jack White with his 1964 JB Hutto Montgomery Ward Airline Guitar

Jack White with his 1964 JB Hutto Montgomery Ward Airline Guitar

White’s vintage JB Hutto Airline became so popular that Eastwood began producing a replica around 2000, however the replica features a chambered mahogany body instead of the original fiberglass model:

Airline 59 2P

The new Airline 59 2P by Eastwood.

 

1950s Kay Hollowbody
This vintage hollowbody was one of the three guitars White used with the White Stripes. The Airline was his primary axe, but White frequently used the Kay Hollowbody as his slide guitar. Kay Instruments was one of the first companies to make an electric guitar. Blues legend Howlin’ Wolf–a major influence on White’s style–was among the most visible artists to use the Kay Hollowbody. This is the guitar White uses for “Seven Nation Army,” arguably the greatest guitar riff of the past decade.

Jack White with his 1950s Kay Hollowbody Guitar

Jack White with his 1950s Kay Hollowbody Guitar

1915 Gibson L-1 Acoustic
This guitar is commonly referred to as the Robert Johnson model. White began playing this guitar on the White Stripes’ Icky Thump album. For live performances, White uses a tape-on pickup. In an interview for Gibson’s website, White reveals that this guitar is his personal favorite.

Jack White with his 1915 Gibson L-1 Acoustic Guitar

Jack White with his 1915 Gibson L-1 Acoustic Guitar

The Raconteurs:

“Triple Green Machine”
This custom-made guitar started with a Gretsch Anniversary Junior. White enlisted Randy Parsons to modify the body and add a slew of bells and whistles, creating a truly unique instrument. He installed the same electronics from his Gretsch Triple Jet, a bigsby tailpiece, a lever-activated mute system, light-activated Theremin and a retractable bullet microphone. This guitar is also featured in the film, It Might Get Loud.

Jack White's Triple Green Machine (Gretsch Anniversary Junior Guitar)

Jack White’s Triple Green Machine (Gretsch Anniversary Junior Guitar)

Gretsch Triple Jet
White is just as particular with the aesthetics of his equipment as he is with their performance. With the Raconteurs, White plated all of his equipment–pedals, amps, guitars–in bronze. This customized axe is based on a Gretsch G5445T Electromatic Double Jet. White added a third pickup (hence, “Triple Jet”) and an onboard MXR Micro Amp. The result gave White a a bronze-plated axe with built-in overdrive.

Jack White's Gretsch Triple Jet Guitar

Jack White’s Gretsch Triple Jet Guitar

Dead Weather:

Gretsch G6199 Billy-Bo Jupiter Thunderbird
This guitar was intended for White’s tour with Alicia Keys in support of their James Bond theme, “Another Way To Die.” Keys had the box-shaped Bo Diddley model, and the idea was for White and Keys to re-create the image of Bo Diddley and the Duchess. When White’s neck injury sidelined that tour, he took up the same idea with Alison Mosshart in the Dead Weather.

Jack White and his 1957 Gretsch G6199 Billy-Bo Jupiter Thunderbird Guitar

Jack White and his 1957 Gretsch G6199 Billy-Bo Jupiter Thunderbird Guitar

1957 Gretsch G6134 White Penguin
Another one of the rarities in Jack White’s collection. Gretsch only produced 12 of this specific model. White found the guitar while touring through Texas in 2007. The white guitar was a natural fit in White’s Dead Weather color scheme. This guitar was also used on the later White Stripes albums.

Solo/Misc.:

Fender Telecaster
This may be the tamest piece in Jack White’s guitar arsenal, but this American classic was White’s main workhorse on his solo album, Blunderbuss. In typical Jack White fashion, the guitar has been outfitted with a Bigsby and painted blue to fit with the project’s color scheme.

Jack White's Fender Telecaster with Bigsby

Jack White’s Fender Telecaster with Bigsby

Gretsch G6022CWFF Rancher Falcon Cutaway Acoustic
This guitar has been a mainstay throughout White’s career. He has said that this model is favorite acoustic to play live, because of the bass tones. Given his flair for customization, White has three Rancher Falcons, each with a portrait of a different women on the back.

White explains that the women featured on his guitars are Claudette Colbert, Rita Hayworth and Veronica Lake, which gives him a brunette, a redhead and a blonde.

Jack White with his Gretsch G6022CWFF Rancher Falcon Cutaway Acoustic Guitar

Jack White with his Gretsch G6022CWFF Rancher Falcon Cutaway Acoustic Guitar

Posted by: Jason Schellhardt, writer for the cheap ticket search engine, Rukkus.

Mike Robinson
Magnatone Amps

Magnatone Amps – The Evolution of Boutique Tone, Yesterday & Today (Part 1)

Magnatone Amps

Magnatone Amps

As a person who has worked in the music retail industry for more than 20 years, I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard about how a quality manufacture was acquired by a larger corporation and imploded from bad “business” decisions, ruining the brand in the process. While not the rule, it happens more often than not in most every industry.

So imagine you work for a family-owned company that distributes music equipment. One day, you are looking through some of the old family catalogs and discover that a very cool, unique brand, which has been out of production for years, has a trademark that has expired and is just sitting there for the taking. What would you do?

Magnatone Amps

Magnatone Amps

Ted Kornblum’s grandfather founded St. Louis Music Supply Co. in 1922. Among the many brands that SLM has distributed are Ampeg, Crate, Alvarez, and Knilling. Also on the company’s distribution list: Magnatone.

Magnatone was started in 1946 by Art Duhamell, who purchased the Dickerson Musical Instrument Manufacturing Company. Dickerson was a small, Southern California builder who produced lap steels and amplifiers. Duhamell changed the name to Magnatone a division of his Magna Electronics Company in Los Angeles. Magna also produced record players, speakers, radios and organs as well as amplifiers under brands such as ToneMaster, DaVinci, Pac-Amp, and Estey. The Estey organ’s vibrato circuit was integral in the birth of the famous Magnatone pitch shifting vibrato feature,(but more on that later). Though Magnatone had a good run of building some of the first, high fidelity, innovative, “boutique” amps to hit the market, the company was plagued by mergers and buy outs, poor business decisions, and bad investments. In the end, Magnatone was no more by the end of the 1960’s.

Magnatone Amps

Magnatone Amps

Fast forward to the early 2000’s, Ted is sitting at his desk one day and he discovers that the Magnatone trademark was abandoned — there for the taking! So Ted quietly makes some inquiries and soon finds himself the owner of the Magnatone brand. He doesn’t tell anyone. Not even his buddy, the Rev Billy Gibbons. He just… waits.

After some years the tables turned, and SLM was that company that ended up being acquired by a larger corporation. We won’t get into the details, but Ted Kornblum eventually found himself free to do what he pleased. Maybe start his own company… maybe do something with his secret acquisition, Magnatone.

Now you have to understand, back when Magnatone amps were made, Fender was the utility amp of time, and Ampeg appealed to the jazz market. Magnatone, by contrast, was known as a boutique amplifier, decades before the boutique craze began. Magnatone amps were not cheap. They had great fidelity, reverb and that famous, pitch shifting stereo vibrato. Fender’s dedicated vibrato channel was actually tremolo, not vibrato, changing the amplitude or volume of the signal, not the pitch. To further muddy the waters, Fender incorrectly labeled its guitars’ vibrato unit a tremolo.

Magnatone Amps

Magnatone Amps

So Ted had been sitting on this brand a while. He had a long time to think about how to revive the Magnatone line. The first step would be putting together a design team that could make the amps a reality. While Magnatone was ahead of its time as far as amp design is concerned, it did have its flaws. For one, the amps were fragile, not up to par to today’s rigorous standards. They also had limited power output — not conducive to today’s rock ‘n roll needs. So the new Magnatones would have to have a balance of both worlds. That luscious, true pitch shifting vibrato, tremolo (yes that FM-AM switch allows for either effect) and a deep, well-like reverb — but with more under the hood, some rock ‘n roll torque for the heavy hitters!

To put this plan in motion, Ted had an ace in his pocket… a guy right here in St. Louis who was responsible for designing practically all things tube that came out of SLM, including the revered Crate Vintage Club series amps. Obeid Khan is not just an engineer with a soldering gun, he’s a player…a serious player! Ask anyone in town, they’ll tell you, Obeid Khan is a monster when it comes to amps and blistering guitar. Khan, splitting time between his own company, Reason amps, and a position repairing vintage tube amps for local vintage gear gurus, Killer Vintage, decided he was up to the challenge of working on the foundation and design on the new Magnatone amps.

Ted and Obeid enlisted a team of engineers including Ken Matthews, Greg Geerling, Dan Ryterski, Chris Villani, George McKale, and the famous Neil Young tech, Larry Cragg to make the Magnatone line a reality. Another ace in the hole was having local cabinet builder and owner of Vintage-Amp Restoration, Gregg Hopkins, involved in the design of the amps, making sure to pay homage aesthetically to Magnatone’s retro look.

Magnatone Amps

Magnatone Amps

So with an all-star team of engineers and the discriminating ears of players like Billy Gibbons, Khan, and Larry Cragg, the team began to prototype the first models of the new Magnatone amplifier and guitar company. Once the first models began rolling off the bench, the decision was made to bring Dave Hinson, owner of Killer Vintage (June 2012 myrareguitars.com) on as sales manager in order to help with dealer placement.

Next month we’ll take a look at the models and features including the magic of the Magnatone Varistor Vibrato!

Written by: David Anderson

Mike Robinson
Vintage Egmond Thunder Electric Guitar

Back Catalog Memories: Egmond Thunder Electric Guitar

Vintage Egmond Thunder Electric Guitar

Vintage Egmond Thunder Electric Guitar

Uilke Egmond (1878-1959) founded a music school and a music shop in Valkenswaard, that was named Musica. In the shop he sold instruments imported from the Eastern Europe. In 1935 the business moved to Eindhoven. The import of instruments ended and they decided to make the instruments on their own.

In the early 50’s there were 20 employees making 50 guitars a week and by the early 60’s there were 80 employees cranking out 2000 guitars a week.

Egmond was the largest luthier in Europe and they were more known for quantity than quality. Cheap instruments were made in large numbers that everyone could. The cheapest models had a price tag that was one tenth the cost for a comparable model of a Gibson or a Fender.

But Egmond also made high quality instruments, the Egmond 2 and 3, 2V and 3V. They had 2 or 3 pickups, as the number states. 2V and 3V (V=vinyl covered body) had the body shape of a Fender Jaguar or Fender Jazzmaster. Later the Egmond 2 and 3 got the name Egmond Thunder, and the Egmond 2V and 3V got the name Egmond Typhoon. A more advanced and luxury guitar, with the same body shape as the 2V and 3V, was the Egmond Tempest.

Here is a fine example of the Egmond Thunder:

Mike Robinson