Back Catalog Memories: 1960’s Domino Californian Electric Guitar

Vintage 1960's Domino Californian Electric Guitar (Redburst)

Not to be confused with the recently re-issued California Rebel by Eastwood Guitars, the Domino Californian came out a few years earlier. Imported to New York by Maurice Lipsky Music Co., these Japanese guitars were part of a series of models branded “Domino” throughout the 1960’s.

Back Catalog Memories: 1960’s Domino Beatle Bass Guitar

Vintage Domino Beatle Bass Guitar

In keeping with the Domino theme this month, let’s take a look at the Domino Beatle Bass. Imported to New York by Maurice Lipsky Music Co., these Japanese guitars were part of a series of models branded “Domino” throughout the 1960’s.

Back Catalog Memories: Vintage 1960’s Domino California Rebel CE82 Electric Guitar

Vintage 1960's Domino California Rebel CE82 Electric Guitar

In the 1960’s Maurice Lipsky Music Co., a prominent importer and distributor in New York City, developed the Domino brand of guitars. One of my favorites from them was the Californian Rebel. Lipsky was also the company that offered the Orpheum brand of guitars from the 1950s on. Many Orpheum’s were made by United Guitars of Jersey City, NJ, the successor to the Oscar Schmidt Company. There is some evidence that Lipsky’s Orpheum name was used on some Italian Wandré guitars, as well.

California Dreamin’ (1960’s Domino Californian Rebel CE82 Electric Guitar)

Vintage 1960's Domino Californian Rebel Electric Guitar

In 1967 Lipsky introduced a line proto-copies carrying the Domino brand name. Most were inspired by European models such as the EKO Violin guitar. Among the offerings were two models sporting a California cache, the #502 Californian, an asymmetrical copy of a Vox Phantom, and the #CE82 Californian Rebel (wouldn’t California Rebel have made more sense?) shown here.

Motorcycle Mama (The Story of Kawai Guitars)

1967 Kawai Concert Electric Guitar

Kawai was founded in 1927 by Koichi Kawai in Hamamatsu, Japan. Mr. Kawai’s vision was to create top-quality pianos, a quest in which he certainly succeeded! Kawai added guitars to its repertoire in around 1954 and eventually became a player in the ’60s Guitar Boom. Like many Japanese electric guitars, most early Kawai guitars were slightly frumpy, although my impression is that their electronics were a little better than some contemporaries. Probably the most prominent brand names in the U.S. manufactured by Kawai were TeleStar, whose sparkle models have a small but devoted following, and Domino.